What I did in my school holidays in July 1968 – Lemmy

What I did in my school holidays in July 1968

By Lemmy Hadassin

‘Twas a cold and smokey highveld, before the winter dawn

A Cessna four-seater, parked neatly on the lawn

The pilot checks the fuel as we all climb on board

Uncertain what’s ahead, a silent prayer to the Lord

Final year at school, I’m just sweet sixteen

Flying to De Aar in the Cape, where I’ve never ever been

My Dad and Bill Moffett, a job there to review

With the pilot, Arthur Webster, and me make up the crew

“Fasten seatbelts rather tightly”, Captain Webster’s call is clear

Nothing to worry about, and not much for me to fear

The engine sounds so noisy as my heart begins to pound

Down the runway at high speed the plane lifts off the ground

We’re flying high, it’s daylight, so much never seen before

A highway here, a farm over there, a dam and so much more

A thermos flask of coffee, and egg sandwiches for us to share

Should be at home studying, but I don’t really care

Flying over mountains, we’re close to our destination

The engine stops, the propeller slows, a worrying situation

The captain tries a restart, unfortunately no such luck

Lets out a loud profanity, which may well rhyme with duck

We glide over the hilltops, and the town is not that far

Perhaps we’ll land on the road, but this is not a car

Arthur spots a sandy track, a good landing’s on today

Little does he know there’s a wall mound in the way

We hit the ground with a mighty bump, the plane does a total flip

Landing upside down and skidding on, as I bit hard on my lip

Held hanging by the seatbelt, I should have stayed in bed

Undo the buckle, and lo and behold I fall onto my head

The Captain fears a fire and kicks out the side door

We scramble along the roof which has now become the floor

We’re out, we’re safe, just a few cuts and bruises to show

The plane’s a wreck, will I fly again – the answer’s a definite no

A farmer saw our plane above, gliding slowly into trouble

Appears with shovels, thought we were buried deep in rubble

Transport to the town, by I know not whom

Should we check-in and get a room?

I offer to ride home on the evening train

A ride on rails sounds good to my brain

Arthur says no – it’s like riding a bike

after falling off, get up and go for a hike

He calls the aero club from a call-box phone

“Send out a bigger plane to take us all home”

A six-seater arrives as sunset is near

An engine up front and one in the rear

The town folk turn out at the aero strip

To watch us fly off in this strange looking ship

My palms are all sweaty, my nerves are a-jitter

I may be a coward but I’m surely no quitter

The new pilot is cool, so I am much calmer

Gets us back home without further drama

Arthur’s bought a new Cessna – is he quite insane?

Will I ever choose to fly with him again?

Hazel & Lemmy Hadassin
2nd Battalion Transvaal Scottish Circa 1972
Rev Sholem Moshe and Bertha (Bluma) Hadassin. Lemmy’s grandparents. Rev in Bloemfontein until 1950

 

JewishGen – The Home of Jewish Genealogy

Bloemfontein  Kehilalink

Perth Kehilalink

 

Rabbi Shalom Coleman In The News

9 December 2021

 

Perth’s Rabbi Dr Shalom Coleman celebrates his 103rd birthday

 

Rabbi Shalom Coleman – 103! – Mazeltov!

With long standing friends from the Bloemfontein days, Barney and Myra Wasserman, taken last week at the Perth Jewish Centre.

Here are photos and items reposted from my previous posts

The People’s Rabbi

Rabbi Shalom Coleman

Who Am I!

Watch Video:

Source: youtu.be/bD4pm_sQ1HE

Coleman

Source: elirab.com/Coleman.html

SHALOM COLEMAN – RABBINIC DYNAMO

by Raymond Apple, emeritus rabbi of the Great Synagogue, Sydney

 Bio about 10 years ago

Small in size but a giant in stature – that describes Rabbi Shalom Coleman, who changed the face of Judaism in Western Australia. Thanks to his refusal to give up or give in, a sleepy, distant community was set on the path to becoming a lively centre of orthodoxy. Rabbi Coleman is now over 90, hopefully with three more decades of work ahead until the proverbial 120.

Born into an orthodox family in Liverpool on 5 December, 1918, he was both a student and a man of action from his youth. At the University of Liverpool he gained a BA degree with honours, plus a Bachelor of Letters in Hebrew and Ancient Semitic Languages and Egyptology. His education was interrupted by World War II when he served with the Royal Air Force as a wireless operator/air gunner on missions in France and Western Europe, and in 1944 he was recruiting officer in England for the Jewish Brigade Group. He returned to university in 1945 as tutor, review writer and librarian.   At Jews’ College, he gained rabbinic ordination in 1955.  He also undertook postgraduate studies in Semitic languages at Pembroke College, Cambridge.

In 1947, at the suggestion of the then Chief Rabbi of South Africa, Dr Louis Rabinowitz, he went to the Potchefstroom Hebrew Congregation in the Transvaal and then served the Bloemfontein Hebrew Congregation in the Orange Free State from 1949-1960.  Whilst in South Africa, he gained an MA at the University of Pretoria and a PhD at the University of the Orange Free State for a thesis entitled “Hosea Concepts in Midrash and Talmud”.

He was chairman of the Adult Education Council (English Section) of the Orange Free State and vice-president of the Victoria League, and introduced essay and oratory contests for schools. As a military chaplain he was active in the ex-service movement and was awarded the Certificate of Comradeship, the highest award of the MOTHS (Memorable Order of Tin Hats). He edited a Jewish community journal called “HaShomer” and an anniversary volume for the 150th anniversary of the Orange Free State.

In 1961 he came to Sydney as rabbi of the South Head Synagogue. He was a member of the Sydney Beth Din, vice-president of the NSW Board of Jewish Education and director of the David J. Benjamin Institute of Jewish Studies, for whom he edited three volumes of proceedings. He established a seminary for the training of Hebrew teachers. He lectured at the University of Sydney and wrote a thesis entitled “Malachi in Midrashic Analysis” for a DLitt.

In 1964 he received the Robert Waley Cohen Scholarship of the Jewish Memorial Council, using it for research into adult education in South-East Asia, Israel and the USA. In 1965 he became rabbi of the Perth Hebrew Congregation in Western Australia.  He held office until retirement in 1985.

He determined to turn Perth into a Makom Torah. He obtained land as a gift in trust from the State Government for a new synagogue, youth centre and minister’s residence in an area where the Jewish community lived in Mount Lawley, replacing the original downtown Shule.   At that time few members were Shom’rei Shabbat. Further initiatives led to a kosher food centre in the Synagogue grounds; a mikveh; a genizah  for the burial of outworn holy books and appurtenances; a Hebrew Academy where high school students met daily, and extra classes four days a week at a nearby state school.

He taught for the Department of Adult Education of the University of WA and served on the Senate of Murdoch University. He was an honorary professor at Maimonides College in Canada, led educational tours to Israel for non-Jewish clergy and teachers, lectured to religious groups, schools and service organisations, and wrote booklets so people of all faiths could understand Jews and Judaism. Talks with the Minister of Education led to a Committee of National Consciousness in Schools, which he chaired; the Minister called his work “invaluable”.

Known as “the rabbi who never stops”, he was a member of the Karrakatta and Pinarroo Valley Cemetery Boards and wrote two histories for them to mark the State’s 150th anniversary in 1979 and the Australian Bicentenary in 1988. He was a member of the Perth Dental Hospital Board and chaired the Senior Appointments Committee and then the Board. The North Perth Dental Clinic is now known as the Shalom Coleman Dental Clinic.

A Rotarian since 1962, first in Sydney and then in Perth, he was President 1985/86 and Governor 1993/9, representative of the World President in 1995, and representative of WA Rotary at the UN Presidential Conference in San Francisco in 1995. He was co-ordinator of the District Ethics and Community Service Committees and chaired the Bangladesh Cyclone Warning Project, which saved the lives of 40,000 residents of the chief fishing port of Bangladesh. He received a certificate of appreciation as District Secretary of Probus Centre, South Pacific. He has spoken at conferences all over the world and is a patron of the Family Association of WA. He has been a vice-president of Save the Children Fund since 1967.

He was a foundation member of the Perth Round Table and their first lecturer. He is still an honorary military chaplain and was on the executive of the Returned Services League and edited their “Listening Post” from 1989-91. He holds high rank in Freemasonry. He is honorary rabbi at the Maurice Zeffertt Centre for the Aged and was made a Governor of the Perth Aged Home Society in 2004. After several years as president of the Australian and New Zealand rabbinate his colleagues made him honorary life president. Several times he went to NZ as interim rabbi for Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur. He shines in the pulpit, and is a fine chazzan.  He has received awards from the Queen and the Australian Government. The University of WA gave him an honorary LLD in April 2000.  He is still, despite his age, a prolific speaker and writer; travels widely and his services are in constant demand.

In 1942 he married Bessie Anna Daviat, who died in 1982.   He has a son in Melbourne, a daughter in the USA, grandchildren and great- grandchildren. He married Elena Doktorovich in 1987; she died in 1997.

Small in stature, Rabbi Coleman is a giant in energy, enterprise and enthusiasm, and is one of Australia’s best known figures. Largely thanks to him, Judaism is strong in Perth, with five synagogues, a Chabad House, a Jewish school, a fine kashrut system, and many shi’urim; his own Talmud shi’ur is legendary. No longer is it a struggle to be Jewish in Western Australia.

The Community Rabbi
With Rabbi Dan Lieberman
With Rivka Majteles
With Rabbi Dovid Freilich and the Blitz Family
With Rabbi Marcus Solomon, Eli Rachamim & Eli Rabinowitz
With Eli Rabinowitz & Joanna Fox

Spiritual Treasure – Book Launch at the Perth Hebrew Congregation

Source: elirab.me/spiritual-treasure-book-launch-at-the-perth-hebrew-congregation/

Rabbi Coleman and The Bloemfontein Reunion

Rabbi Coleman and Bloemfontein Reunion

Rabbi Coleman reminisces about his time in Bloemfontein as Jewish Spiritual Leader – 1949 to 1959.  Perth, Australia 3 February 2016

Watch Video:

Source: youtu.be/GVUN1PtPD0g

 

Rabbi Shalom Coleman 103! Mazeltov!

5 December 2021

Rabbi Shalom Coleman – 103! – Mazeltov!

With long standing friends from the Bloemfontein days, Barney and Myra Wasserman, taken last week at the Perth Jewish Centre.

Here are photos and items reposted from my previous posts

The People’s Rabbi

Rabbi Shalom Coleman

Who Am I!

Watch Video:

Source: youtu.be/bD4pm_sQ1HE

Coleman

Source: elirab.com/Coleman.html

SHALOM COLEMAN – RABBINIC DYNAMO

by Raymond Apple, emeritus rabbi of the Great Synagogue, Sydney

 Bio about 10 years ago

Small in size but a giant in stature – that describes Rabbi Shalom Coleman, who changed the face of Judaism in Western Australia. Thanks to his refusal to give up or give in, a sleepy, distant community was set on the path to becoming a lively centre of orthodoxy. Rabbi Coleman is now over 90, hopefully with three more decades of work ahead until the proverbial 120.

Born into an orthodox family in Liverpool on 5 December, 1918, he was both a student and a man of action from his youth. At the University of Liverpool he gained a BA degree with honours, plus a Bachelor of Letters in Hebrew and Ancient Semitic Languages and Egyptology. His education was interrupted by World War II when he served with the Royal Air Force as a wireless operator/air gunner on missions in France and Western Europe, and in 1944 he was recruiting officer in England for the Jewish Brigade Group. He returned to university in 1945 as tutor, review writer and librarian.   At Jews’ College, he gained rabbinic ordination in 1955.  He also undertook postgraduate studies in Semitic languages at Pembroke College, Cambridge.

In 1947, at the suggestion of the then Chief Rabbi of South Africa, Dr Louis Rabinowitz, he went to the Potchefstroom Hebrew Congregation in the Transvaal and then served the Bloemfontein Hebrew Congregation in the Orange Free State from 1949-1960.  Whilst in South Africa, he gained an MA at the University of Pretoria and a PhD at the University of the Orange Free State for a thesis entitled “Hosea Concepts in Midrash and Talmud”.

He was chairman of the Adult Education Council (English Section) of the Orange Free State and vice-president of the Victoria League, and introduced essay and oratory contests for schools. As a military chaplain he was active in the ex-service movement and was awarded the Certificate of Comradeship, the highest award of the MOTHS (Memorable Order of Tin Hats). He edited a Jewish community journal called “HaShomer” and an anniversary volume for the 150th anniversary of the Orange Free State.

In 1961 he came to Sydney as rabbi of the South Head Synagogue. He was a member of the Sydney Beth Din, vice-president of the NSW Board of Jewish Education and director of the David J. Benjamin Institute of Jewish Studies, for whom he edited three volumes of proceedings. He established a seminary for the training of Hebrew teachers. He lectured at the University of Sydney and wrote a thesis entitled “Malachi in Midrashic Analysis” for a DLitt.

In 1964 he received the Robert Waley Cohen Scholarship of the Jewish Memorial Council, using it for research into adult education in South-East Asia, Israel and the USA. In 1965 he became rabbi of the Perth Hebrew Congregation in Western Australia.  He held office until retirement in 1985.

He determined to turn Perth into a Makom Torah. He obtained land as a gift in trust from the State Government for a new synagogue, youth centre and minister’s residence in an area where the Jewish community lived in Mount Lawley, replacing the original downtown Shule.   At that time few members were Shom’rei Shabbat. Further initiatives led to a kosher food centre in the Synagogue grounds; a mikveh; a genizah  for the burial of outworn holy books and appurtenances; a Hebrew Academy where high school students met daily, and extra classes four days a week at a nearby state school.

He taught for the Department of Adult Education of the University of WA and served on the Senate of Murdoch University. He was an honorary professor at Maimonides College in Canada, led educational tours to Israel for non-Jewish clergy and teachers, lectured to religious groups, schools and service organisations, and wrote booklets so people of all faiths could understand Jews and Judaism. Talks with the Minister of Education led to a Committee of National Consciousness in Schools, which he chaired; the Minister called his work “invaluable”.

Known as “the rabbi who never stops”, he was a member of the Karrakatta and Pinarroo Valley Cemetery Boards and wrote two histories for them to mark the State’s 150th anniversary in 1979 and the Australian Bicentenary in 1988. He was a member of the Perth Dental Hospital Board and chaired the Senior Appointments Committee and then the Board. The North Perth Dental Clinic is now known as the Shalom Coleman Dental Clinic.

A Rotarian since 1962, first in Sydney and then in Perth, he was President 1985/86 and Governor 1993/9, representative of the World President in 1995, and representative of WA Rotary at the UN Presidential Conference in San Francisco in 1995. He was co-ordinator of the District Ethics and Community Service Committees and chaired the Bangladesh Cyclone Warning Project, which saved the lives of 40,000 residents of the chief fishing port of Bangladesh. He received a certificate of appreciation as District Secretary of Probus Centre, South Pacific. He has spoken at conferences all over the world and is a patron of the Family Association of WA. He has been a vice-president of Save the Children Fund since 1967.

He was a foundation member of the Perth Round Table and their first lecturer. He is still an honorary military chaplain and was on the executive of the Returned Services League and edited their “Listening Post” from 1989-91. He holds high rank in Freemasonry. He is honorary rabbi at the Maurice Zeffertt Centre for the Aged and was made a Governor of the Perth Aged Home Society in 2004. After several years as president of the Australian and New Zealand rabbinate his colleagues made him honorary life president. Several times he went to NZ as interim rabbi for Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur. He shines in the pulpit, and is a fine chazzan.  He has received awards from the Queen and the Australian Government. The University of WA gave him an honorary LLD in April 2000.  He is still, despite his age, a prolific speaker and writer; travels widely and his services are in constant demand.

In 1942 he married Bessie Anna Daviat, who died in 1982.   He has a son in Melbourne, a daughter in the USA, grandchildren and great- grandchildren. He married Elena Doktorovich in 1987; she died in 1997.

Small in stature, Rabbi Coleman is a giant in energy, enterprise and enthusiasm, and is one of Australia’s best known figures. Largely thanks to him, Judaism is strong in Perth, with five synagogues, a Chabad House, a Jewish school, a fine kashrut system, and many shi’urim; his own Talmud shi’ur is legendary. No longer is it a struggle to be Jewish in Western Australia.

The Community Rabbi
With Rabbi Dan Lieberman
With Rivka Majteles
With Rabbi Dovid Freilich and the Blitz Family
With Rabbi Marcus Solomon, Eli Rachamim & Eli Rabinowitz
With Eli Rabinowitz & Joanna Fox

Spiritual Treasure – Book Launch at the Perth Hebrew Congregation

Source: elirab.me/spiritual-treasure-book-launch-at-the-perth-hebrew-congregation/

Rabbi Coleman and The Bloemfontein Reunion

Rabbi Coleman and Bloemfontein Reunion

Rabbi Coleman reminisces about his time in Bloemfontein as Jewish Spiritual Leader – 1949 to 1959.  Perth, Australia 3 February 2016

Watch Video:

Source: youtu.be/GVUN1PtPD0g

 

Doornfontein, Johannesburg

25 November 2021

From Benzie Pikoos in Perth.

Beth Hamedrash HaGadol

This picture was taken around 1960 at the Beth Hamedrash HaGadol (Berele Chagi) shul. Do you recognise anyone there? I see Selwyn Feinblum, and Jossi Stern. These were most probably Doornfontein people.

I used to sing in the choir. Had my barmitzvah there as well. Rabbi Kossofsky was the rabbi. He was also the founder of Yeshivah College.

Doornfontein,

Berele Chagy

 

My photos of the Beit Hamidrash Hagadol, now University of Johannesburg, from Ishvara Dhyan’s walking tour of Doornfontein – 24 March 2016

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

My photos of the Jewish Government School, from Ishvara Dhyan’s walking tour of Doornfontein – 24 March 2016

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Jewish government school 1959

Included in the photo is Benzie Pikoos and Mervyn Druker


Standard 1 Class of 1959 (Combined with Grade 2) Courtesy Alan Mymin
Each row L to R

Back Row: Cecil Goldstein. Jeffrey Epstein. Louis Potgieter. Benzie Pikoos. Mervyn Sherman. Reginald Rumney. Arnold Gossel.

3rd Row: Filip Nowydwor. Sylvio…………. Walter Allen. Mervyn Druker. Anthony Atkins.Tyrone Bevaud. Allan Bower. Alan Mymin.

2nd Row: Dawn Cohen. Avril Nino. Madeleine Mattis …………………Miss Shirley? Rabinowitz, Linda Shapiro. Jean Wiggil. Rene Altaris. Anita Goldstein.

Front Row: Steven (Moekie) Weiler. Calvin Fredericks. Denise Nauman. Cynthia Slutzki.Stella Botta. Denise……….. Jackie…………. Ralph Wingrove. Michael Marcus.

21 November 2021

I received a call from Ethne Epstein in Melbourne to tell me that the Harris of the Harris Camp in PE, was her grandfather, I. H. Harris from Johannesburg.

See more about Isadore Harris and Doornfontein here:

The Jewish Government School

Education Several Jewish schools were built, and one, the Jewish Government School, now the IH Harris Primary School in Davies Street, Doornfontein, still goes strong. Yiddish used to be the only language heard in the playground. (City of Johannesburg – Jews mark 120 years)

From Ethne Epstein:

I don’t have very much information on the camps, but understand they took place in Port Elizabeth in the 1920’s and 1930’s. From what I understand there were no Jewish camps, and because my Grandfather Isadore Harris was the principal of the Jewish Government School in Doornfontein, he arranged camps for Jewish families from Johannesburg during the December holidays. Exactly where in Port Elizabeth I have no idea.
They were all in tents close to the beach.
In 1966 Jewish Government was renamed the I H Harris Primary school.
A photo I have is of my Granny Minnie Harris with two of the sons, Kenny and Denny. My late Dad is on the left.

Alan who is sitting on the car is the an older brother.

I am not sure if this is another photo from camp or when my Dad was in the army. Although some of the guys were smoking it looks similar surroundings

Warm Regards
Ethne
————–

Previously from Gil Friedstein, Israel on 9 October 2021

Port Elizabeth, South Africa – mid 1920s

Harris Camp – Billy, Sidney and Hilda (1st row)
Gil Friedstein is happy to share his grandparents’  holiday photos  from Port Elizabeth sometime in the mid 1920s. 
All the  photos (exept for the last one) were taken at Harris Camp and Gil will be most thankful  for any information referring to this place  gil.friedstein@hotmail.com
 
Alan Harris must have been a member of the family that ran the camp, and the two group photos give us a pretty good idea as to the number families who came to the camp.  
Alan Harris and friends
Granny, Hilda, Billy, Sidney and Elsie
Alan Harris
Hilda and Billy
Mrs Makin, Hilda, Billy and Sidney
Oupa
Harris Camp
Oupa, Granny, Hilda, Billy and the Rosenbergs at the beach

Harris Camp, PE to Doornfontein

25 November 2021

From Benzie Pikoos in Perth.

Beth Hamedrash HaGadol

This picture was taken around 1960 at the Beth Hamedrash HaGadol (Berele Chagi) shul. Do you recognise anyone there? I see Selwyn Feinblum, and Jossi Stern. These were most probably Doornfontein people.

I used to sing in the choir. Had my barmitzvah there as well. Rabbi Kossofsky was the rabbi. He was also the founder of Yeshivah College.

Doornfontein,

Berele Chagy

 

My photos of the Beit Hamidrash Hagadol, now University of Johannesburg, from Ishvara Dhyan’s walking tour of Doornfontein – 24 March 2016

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

My photos of the Jewish Government School, from Ishvara Dhyan’s walking tour of Doornfontein – 24 March 2016

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Jewish government school 1959

Included in the photo is Benzie Pikoos and Mervyn Druker


Standard 1 Class of 1959 (Combined with Grade 2) Courtesy Alan Mymin
Each row L to R

Back Row: Cecil Goldstein. Jeffrey Epstein. Louis Potgieter. Benzie Pikoos. Mervyn Sherman. Reginald Rumney. Arnold Gossel.

3rd Row: Filip Nowydwor. Sylvio…………. Walter Allen. Mervyn Druker. Anthony Atkins.Tyrone Bevaud. Allan Bower. Alan Mymin.

2nd Row: Dawn Cohen. Avril Nino. Madeleine Mattis …………………Miss Shirley? Rabinowitz, Linda Shapiro. Jean Wiggil. Rene Altaris. Anita Goldstein.

Front Row: Steven (Moekie) Weiler. Calvin Fredericks. Denise Nauman. Cynthia Slutzki.Stella Botta. Denise……….. Jackie…………. Ralph Wingrove. Michael Marcus.

21 November 2021

I received a call from Ethne Epstein in Melbourne to tell me that the Harris of the Harris Camp in PE, was her grandfather, I. H. Harris from Johannesburg.

See more about Isadore Harris and Doornfontein here:

The Jewish Government School

Education Several Jewish schools were built, and one, the Jewish Government School, now the IH Harris Primary School in Davies Street, Doornfontein, still goes strong. Yiddish used to be the only language heard in the playground. (City of Johannesburg – Jews mark 120 years)

From Ethne Epstein:

I don’t have very much information on the camps, but understand they took place in Port Elizabeth in the 1920’s and 1930’s. From what I understand there were no Jewish camps, and because my Grandfather Isadore Harris was the principal of the Jewish Government School in Doornfontein, he arranged camps for Jewish families from Johannesburg during the December holidays. Exactly where in Port Elizabeth I have no idea.
They were all in tents close to the beach.
In 1966 Jewish Government was renamed the I H Harris Primary school.
A photo I have is of my Granny Minnie Harris with two of the sons, Kenny and Denny. My late Dad is on the left.

Alan who is sitting on the car is the an older brother.

I am not sure if this is another photo from camp or when my Dad was in the army. Although some of the guys were smoking it looks similar surroundings

Warm Regards
Ethne
————–

Previously from Gil Friedstein, Israel on 9 October 2021

Port Elizabeth, South Africa – mid 1920s

Harris Camp – Billy, Sidney and Hilda (1st row)
Gil Friedstein is happy to share his grandparents’  holiday photos  from Port Elizabeth sometime in the mid 1920s. 
All the  photos (exept for the last one) were taken at Harris Camp and Gil will be most thankful  for any information referring to this place  gil.friedstein@hotmail.com
 
Alan Harris must have been a member of the family that ran the camp, and the two group photos give us a pretty good idea as to the number families who came to the camp.  
Alan Harris and friends
Granny, Hilda, Billy, Sidney and Elsie
Alan Harris
Hilda and Billy
Mrs Makin, Hilda, Billy and Sidney
Oupa
Harris Camp
Oupa, Granny, Hilda, Billy and the Rosenbergs at the beach

74th Yahrzeit of Josek Rotsztejn of Nasielsk

Rotsztejn means red stone – the ancestor worked in a brick field and was always covered in red brick dust

 


gen.org/nasielsk/Rotsztejn.html

Marriage #14 reg. in Nasielsk April 21, 1882 of Josek ROTSZTEJN, 23, son of the late Miszka and Chai Sura nee GRANAT of Nasielsk to Chana Rajzla BLASZKA, 20, dau. of Moszko and Ryfka Ruchla nee BANK of Nasielsk. Witnesses: Gersz RAPY, 70, and Dawid CIELOWNIKA, 60.

South Africa – Raie, Annie (Chana) Joseph (Josek), Leonard and Claude
Far right at Raie & Barney’s Wedding 1943
Chana and Josek Rotzstejn became Annie and Joseph Reitstein
Cape Town Newspaper announcement of Joseph’s death, November 1947

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rotsztejns of Nasielsk

Warsaw to Nasielsk – 53km
Chana and Josek Rotsztejn became Annie and Joseph Reitstein
Rotsztejn means red stone – the ancestor worked in a brick field and was always covered in red brick dust
Rotsztejn Family names on the Nasielsk register, including Josek and his mother, Chaia Sura

 


gen.org/nasielsk/Rotsztejn.html

Marriage #14 reg. in Nasielsk April 21, 1882 of Josek ROTSZTEJN, 23, son of the late Miszka and Chai Sura nee GRANAT of Nasielsk to Chana Rajzla BLASZKA, 20, dau. of Moszko and Ryfka Ruchla nee BANK of Nasielsk. Witnesses: Gersz RAPY, 70, and Dawid CIELOWNIKA, 60.

1901 UK Census UK – Spitalfields, London.  Gershon and Sarah were born in London
UK Census 1911 Solomon was born in Spitafields
Family came out to South Africa on different ships
South Africa – Raie, Annie (Chana) Joseph (Josek), Leonard and Claude
Julian (Judah) Reitstein
Claude, Julian, Raie – in front :Maurice & Leonard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cape Town Newspaper announcement of Joseph’s death, November 1947

 

Descendants of Chai Sura Granat RotsztejnChai Sura Granat (Rotsztejn) – Descendant Chart

6th generation of descendants not included

Double Ancestors Dean & Neil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reitstein – Saevitzon Wedding – Cape Town 1953

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Reitstein brothers:Maurice, Claude and Leonard
Melanie & Julian Reitstein & daughters ; . Melanie & Julian are the only other family members known to have visited Nasielsk
Reitstein Family in Australia

Return to Nasielsk 2012

Jill and Eli with friend Wojceich of Warsaw

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Harris Camp, Port Elizabeth Update

21 November 2021

I have received a call from Ethne Epstein in Melbourne to tell me that the Harris of the Harris Camp in PE, was her grandfather, I. H. Harris from Johannesburg.

See more about Isadore Harris here:

https://elirab.me/jewish-doornfontein-part-4/

The Jewish Government School

Education Several Jewish schools were built, and one, the Jewish Government School, now the IH Harris Primary School in Davies Street, Doornfontein, still goes strong. Yiddish used to be the only language heard in the playground. (City of Johannesburg – Jews mark 120 years)

From Ethne Epstein:

I don’t have very much information on the camps, but understand they took place in Port Elizabeth in the 1920’s and 1930’s. From what I understand there were no Jewish camps, and because my Grandfather Isadore Harris was the principal of the Jewish Government School in Doornfontein, he arranged camps for Jewish families from Johannesburg during the December holidays. Exactly where in Port Elizabeth I have no idea.
They were all in tents close to the beach.
In 1966 Jewish Government was renamed the I H Harris Primary school.
A photo I have is of my Granny Minnie Harris with two of the sons, Kenny and Denny. My late Dad is on the left.

Alan who is sitting on the car is the an older brother.

I am not sure if this is another photo from camp or when my Dad was in the army. Although some of the guys were smoking it looks similar surroundings

Warm Regards
Ethne
————–

Previously from Gil Friedstein, Israel

Port Elizabeth, South Africa – mid 1920s

Harris Camp – Billy, Sidney and Hilda (1st row)
Gil Friedstein is happy to share his grandparents’  holiday photos  from Port Elizabeth sometime in the mid 1920s. 
All the  photos (exept for the last one) were taken at Harris Camp and Gil will be most thankful  for any information referring to this place  gil.friedstein@hotmail.com
 
Alan Harris must have been a member of the family that ran the camp, and the two group photos give us a pretty good idea as to the number families who came to the camp.  
Alan Harris and friends
Granny, Hilda, Billy, Sidney and Elsie
Alan Harris
Hilda and Billy
Mrs Makin, Hilda, Billy and Sidney
Oupa
Harris Camp
Oupa, Granny, Hilda, Billy and the Rosenbergs at the beach

Muizenberg Memories

Muizenberg Memories

By Marlene Davis Stanger
My mom, Pearl Davis, at her engagement party to my dad, with her parents, Esther Bryna (nee Friedman, from Zemelis, Lithuania) and Morris Herman (Moshe Zelig Woznica) from Poland
Abe & Pearl Davis Wedding 1948
Muizenberg kids at Betar meeting with Madrichim David Lazarus and Alan Pick. I am in pigtails with hand at heart
Marlene with friend Gillian Mansfield on left and the late Clem Stoltz on right. Taken lunch time one summer while working at Tockar’s pharmacy
Muizenberg memories
Marleme with Eunice Baartman on a picnic in Simonstown
Muizenberg Corner stone steps
With Dr Stan Davis St James Beach on one of regular Mzb to Kalk Bay walks whenever there
Dad – Abe Davis at “Stanette”
Dad & Sister
The six Davis grandchildren on the wall at Stanette , Windermere Rd, Muizenberg. Two Davis girls, two Stanger boys and two Simantov boys.
The Muizenberg KehilaLink:

managed by Eli Rabinowitz

eli@elirab.com

A Fairy Tale Of Two Cities

In memory of my parents

By Marlene Davis Stanger

This story is written as a tribute to my late parents, Abe and Pearl Davis, who lived in Muizenberg for 56 years before moving to Highlands House, Oranjezicht, in 2005. Abe passed away October 22, 2007 aged 94 – less than a mile from where he was born – and Pearl passed away on July 24, 2016, aged 92.

My granny, Mrs. Esther Bryna Herman, from Malvern by way of Vilnius, had a friend called Sonya Blechman.  My dad, born at 2 Prince Street, Gardens, had an aunt called Tilly Josman.   Mrs. Blechman told her friend, Aunty Tilly, about the beautiful daughter of her friend and Aunty Tilly thought, “Ahh, time for my nephew Abie to settle down…enough of the post-war gallivanting…”  So next time Abie was up in Joburg – Roodepoort to be exact, to see the relatives – Aunty Tilly invited Mr. and Mrs. Herman and the Blechman’s and Pearl came along too.

Abie was smitten. The blond, blue eyed, water-polo playing Davis boy could not stop thinking of the dark-haired, tall, thin and elegant Pearl and when he got home to Cape Town, he wrote her a letter.  It was written on thin, air-mail paper on two pages on the letterhead of his brother, Simon’s company that was simply called Simon Davis.  But he had crossed out the name Simon and replaced it with Abe.

It was a love letter and said he believed they could have a happy life together. An engagement followed and Pearl, an only child, flew down to Cape Town to meet the Davis family.  She wore a new white suit and a new stylish hat but by the time she arrived, air-sick and disheveled, she felt anything but stylish. Abe brought her to the family home at 7 Marais Road, Sea Point.  There she met “Mother” (Chaya Itil “Annie” nee Josman) and “Father” (Hyman Davis formerly Melnick in the old country prior to telling Cape Town customs that his name was Chaim Dovid….).  This is how the Davis children referred to their Yiddish speaking parents.  The children consisted of Abe and his siblings, who were Simon, Louis, Issy, Ethel, Harry, Alfred and Lily.  Pearl was welcomed into the fold and soon found out about the gregarious, sporty, movie loving boys – all fast eaters –  and the sisters, the older one sassy and irreverent and the baby, sweet and adored.

The wedding took place at Marais Road shul and Pearl and Abe had to decide where they wanted to settle down – Camps Bay, where brother Alfred and his wife Rae (nee Katzeff), had set up home, or Muizenberg, where Simon and Rose and Issy and Rose lived.  Muizenberg it was. 1948 – what a year!  As Hedy no-relation-Davis aptly stated, veritable Shtetl by the Sea.  They moved to Clevedon Cottage in Clevedon Road and had their first baby, Stan, in 1949.  The following year they moved to Windermere Road and in 1951, baby number two, Annette was born.  They named their house “Stanette.”

I came along in 1954.  And what do I remember?  I will first of all say that Bobba Bryna Herman was living with us by that time, since Morris Zelig (after whom I was named Marlene “Masha” Zelda) had passed away suddenly while on holiday in Muizenberg a few years before.  I remember the promenade walks on summer nights, the ice-creams at the Milk Bar in the pavilion, the Sunday trips to Mr. Raad’s café for toffee apples and Tex bars, the egg-salad sandwiches at Sunrise beach on balmy February evenings when we all went swimming after dad came home from work, the Kushners next door, playing in the park across the road from shul, playing at the park near the vlei, playing marbles on the field next to the Liebrecht’s house – all under the loving protection of Abe and Pearl, and of course, Bobba.  There were the Sunday drives through Tokai, stopping to buy Hanepoort grapes when in season, to see Zayda in Sea Point and have tea with the extended Davis family.  The large dining room table surrounded by uncles, aunts and first cousins.

By then, my dad had his own business importing home wares from China and traveling on sales trips.  He had a driver, Courtman, who taught me Xhosa and who named his firstborn Stanley.  Then Abe’s fortune changed and he lost the business.  I remember the anxious day when a man came to meet with my parents to talk about the insurance business.  He was with Sun Life of Canada. My dad joined them and continued through to Liberty Life, leaving only in his 80’s.  The young staff by that time called him Uncle Abie.  My mom got a job as well. I was six.  She was secretary at Floyd and Emery, prominent architects in their day.  Zayda (my dad’s “Father”) died round that time as well. His tailor shop, Davis and Stevens, on Long Street, purveyors of fine cloth and excellent taste, had the distinction of making the graduation gown for Queen Elizabeth (the Queen Mother) when she received her honorary Doctor of Laws degree from UCT in April, 1947.  He also rode a Harley with a side car and was the tall, handsome patriarch, rocking in the chair at 7 Marais Road, always dressed impeccably with his pocket watch an object of fascination for all the grandkids.

School, cheder, the beach, the freedom to play, catching the train to town on a 21c ticket to go to lunch at Garlicks and a movie and still having change from R1, and the knowledge that the world had an order defined by a fine moral compass and the love of family. It was a village. It took a village.

Then there was the music.  Dan Hill and his orchestra, Frank Sinatra, Buddy Holly, always music.  And standing in my parent’s room at my mom’s dressing table watching her get dressed to go dancing with my dad on a Saturday night.  The beautiful brocade dress with roses on the waist sash, the purple satin dress with the built in petticoat, the impossibly small waistline… I learnt about perfume behind your ears and on your wrists…

Into the teens.  Socials at the Herzl Hall in Wherry Road. How embarrassing for me that my dad and others on the shul committee who had organized the event were in the kitchen selling Fanta, Coke and Bar Ones…didn’t want him to see me slow dancing with Joburg and Durban boys in Muizies for the season.  Bands were Shag and Jimmy Retief and the Idiots.  Jimmy used to play the guitar with his teeth…

My mom always had an expanding Shabbat table.  When my dad came home from shul, we never knew how many Navy boys he would bring with him on a Friday night.  Another incentive to look nice for Shabbat! My mom also had a remarkable, expanded vocabulary and I called her my walking dictionary.  She graduated from Jeppe Girls’ High and her leather bound prize books which I cherish attest to her brilliance. First in Latin, First in Math, First in class.  She could have been a doctor like her Reichman cousins in Joburg, but instead she learned to type.

Baking, collecting rummage, organizing meetings – always involved in the community.  My dad, shul chairman or president for as long as I can remember.  Both life members of the shul.  Charity and acts of loving kindness were part of the fabric of my home, with early lessons about helping others very clearly imprinted in my mind.

Overall, we made one another happy and laughed so much.  I watched Monty Python with my mom at the Empire and by the time the opening credits for And Now For Something Completely Different came on the screen, we were already in tears from laughing so much.  I learned about fun and laughter, music and dancing, from my parents. I learned about reading voraciously and hard work, from my parents. I learned about faith and loyalty and relationships from my parents.  When Stan, Netty and I remember our father, we go : “He he he” (the e like staccato air without the r.)  We learned about happiness and contentment, the riches of good family relationships, from him.

I cannot even begin to tell the whole story of who they were and what they meant to me and those who knew them. My beloved parents, village elders who held the community in their hearts.  Both in Muizenberg where they lived their halcyon years and at Highlands House where they lived their final years, together there for a short time and now together again. Joburg girl and Cape Town boy with Muizenberg their medina.

So when I walk on the beach in Del Mar or Torrey Pines and I wear the floppy hats I brought home with me after burying darling Pearl next to her Abe, I will think of those who wore the hats before me on the sands of Muizies and walk tall and happy knowing that their spirits are both alive and flowing in me.  The music, dancing, fun and reading, learning, working and giving will continue.

Wherever you may be, Mrs. Blechman and Aunty Tilly – thank you for the great mitzvah.

With love,

Marlene

https://stanger-immigration.com/

The Muizenberg KehilaLink:

managed by Eli Rabinowitz

eli@elirab.com